(This is a continuation from previous post: The 4th Muse Tip)

5. BE FOCUSED. I have already discussed in a post why I am not a big fan of multi-tasking. Studies have shown that multi-tasking and multi-focusing are proven to be detrimental to work quality and task performance.  However, how can one be focused on writing when one is busy juggling a job, family and other important personal concerns?

Again, the answer is in the planning. Structure and discipline also play major parts in the creative process for the ‘weekends only’ artist.  Planning may well be the most difficult part of the process but once you are able to go over this hurdle, then the rest is smooth sailing.  Offer your Mondays to Saturdays for work and family while setting aside time every Sunday for yourself and your creative pursuits.  Do this in a quiet room in your house with no distractions.  Explain to your spouse and kids about your need for ‘creativity time.’

The disadvantage of doing this for only once a week though is that the narration or your story flow is continually being put on hold since you have to stop and sleep so you can wake up early tomorrow to go back to your regular work.  In my experience, this was usually accompanied with feelings of irritation and impatience (due to yearnings to go back to your writing) especially when you are already ‘in the zone,’ sometimes even bitterly blaming ‘work’ for temporarily impeding this creative output.  The best that you can do is to post your story plan or timeline next to you while you write so you can track where you were or where you left off.

Don’t overdo or go beyond your ‘creativity time.’ Creativity requires extreme concentration and there is a danger that you may shut out everything else, become oblivious to the time and may overlook things and other details in your life that also matter.  Relationships and job performance may suffer as a result.  In order to efficiently balance it all out (day job, family, and creative work), it would be a good idea to use a planner or a day to day schedule to make sure you won’t forget everything else and so that you can effectively assume your roles and carry out your responsibilities as a full-time worker, full-time parent/spouse, and part-time artist.  Use an alarm clock and set it beforehand so you can be conscious of the time.  Make sure to include in your schedule enough rest–both physically and mentally, as well.

6. BE PATIENT. I mentioned already once that one of my life’s mottoes is “One step at a time.”   If you have your goal in mind and know where you’re going, then rest assured that you will accomplish each step in the story flow until finally, you have reached the very end.  However, as expected, the writing pace will be much slower especially for the ‘weekends only’ writer compared to the one who does this for a living.  As I said, you tend to blame work or familial responsibilities from taking time away from your creative pursuits.  You become snappy and cantankerous. Be careful not to fall prey to this cliché–that artists naturally have this ‘artistic temperament.’  I have personally encountered how these s0-called artists justify their selfish, angry outbursts and childish tantrums with excuses pertaining to this so-called ‘temperament.’  Artist or not–it is unfair for people around you to see you like this because definitely they are also affected by your behavior and may even resent it.  You have to check yourself when this happens.  I advise you to be a human being first before you start considering yourself an artist.

Despite everything that I said, and even if I follow all these tips, I still expect that things may not go as planned.  But definitely, the chance of finishing a novel this way is far greater than someone who did not plan ahead.

For the aspiring writer, good luck! You don’t have to wait for next year’s NaNoMo to start writing that novel.  Why not start now?  Through visualizing, observing, reflecting, planning, discipline, structure, and lots and lots of patience, there may be no need to search for your personal Muse.  She will just show up in the sidelines, cheering you on…

As I mentioned before, I would like to contribute to National Novel Month (NaNoMo)–not in the form of a written novel but ideas on how to start writing. And as I said in my previous post, I take back what I said about being a weekend artist or writer.

I realized, after much thought, that it IS possible to accomplish something creative while still having a day job…if i just knew how to plan.  Planning is everything. But some artists resist planning, preferring to be spontaneous and their manner of artistic outpouring as unstructured and raw as much as possible, unpredictable spurts of artistic madness.  But the trouble with that is one may end up scratching his head and asking himself: “WTF am i doing?” Nevertheless, I guess that an artist, musician or writer who plans and reflects more may have a better chance of not only starting an artwork, story, poem or song but ultimately ending up with an actual finished piece, and being happy and satisfied with the results.

However, it is the dreaded DAY JOB that prevents one from pursuing artistic endeavors.  So I came up with tips for myself (and for those who may find them helpful) on how I can practice art even ‘during the weekends’ without compromising quality of work.  Sometimes, the Muse doesn’t come to you but nobody said you can’t go searching for her.  I call these tips The 6 MUSE TIPS:

1. DESIRE IT. If you are driven, then anything is possible.  If you’re just forcing yourself, then don’t bother picking up the pen or brush. Visualizing the outcome helps.  Envision yourself looking at the bookshelves with copies of your books being sold.  Imagine making readers stop and stare, pore over your words, getting a reaction from them–a tear, a smile or even a raised eyebrow.

2. SEARCH YOUR FEELINGS and your emotions and experiences–love, hate, anger, frustrations, ordeals and triumphs and be ready to share them.  These are yours and no one can take them away from you.  You cannot be an artist if there is nothing to share.  Otherwise you’re not just fooling yourself but other people as well. Experts can tell, too, if you’re just skilled in a superficial, technical way… or possessing a talent that emanates deep from your heart, soul and mind just by looking at your artwork or literary piece.  If it is impersonal or obviously hackneyed from a trend set by other artists who are more established, they can sense that you’re not just being mediocre, you’re also being insincere.  Find your own unique voice.

3.  BE OBSERVANT. Be a sponge and absorb everything around you.  If you’re stuck or feeling nonchalant about life, then you have to start educating yourself. Listen to people’s stories.  Be curious.  Study and watch people, things, nature, animals, the sky, the weather.  Know other people’s feelings, their problems and how they overcame them (or if they weren’t able to, find out why).  Ask what upsets them and what makes them laugh.  Check the other side of the coin and try to understand. If words are not being spoken, learn to sense them. Stimulate your senses using your sensory perceptions–smell and taste different foods, see a way of life that is foreign to your own, get out of your comfort zone, take nature trips, train yourself to look at the tiniest details, find out what they’re called and describe them in your head.  Or ask yourself how you feel about anything–like the hazy sunset or long dark shadows falling on an adobe wall, etc.  Be amazed at an ordinary thing (or find the irony), then compare or contrast it (a lone tree in the horizon, a smooth pebble glistening in a neglected garden) with people you know.  You can come up with a hundred story angles and themes, fill them up with these unique details that you yourself have discovered; create your own personal meanings, philosophies, and beliefs. This is the unique gift of the artists–to see beyond the ordinary.  And it is their job to help others who lack this special faculty of  ‘seeing’ and bring these out into the open through the arts.  You’re actually showing them the unseen, the unheard, the unnoticed, and the unfelt, thereby with your help, these become real and true.

The next tip is about Planning and Organizing which I consider very important keys in coming up with a work of art.  I figured it deserves to be discussed next time since I have a lot to say about it.

To be continued in the next post.

I have been working on two other blogs–still for wordpress.  Envisioned as a personal blog, ‘on my palette’ is more for fun, light-hearted topics geared for loved ones, few super-close friends and harmless strangers alike.  Here, I can talk, rave or rant about whatever comes to my head (but still with a bit of discretion); meaning, a wide range of topics I am interested in, no-holds-barred so to speak.  And it is not something I would like my associates that belong in my professional sphere to read for reasons pertaining to privacy.  I mean, I am ‘for-getting-to-know-you’ stuff but there has to be some boundaries.

That is why i came up with two other blogs with specific themes.  These are my professional blogs.  They both deal with my work, studies, and professional background which is art and education (having a professional blog would also be good to put in your CVs — wink wink– um, not that I’m looking for a new job though).

One of these professional blogs is called white skies, blue clouds:

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‘white skies, blue clouds’ is my education blog (no need to explain what the title means because it really is irrelevant).  Basically, my topics on education, reading, research, books, and teaching that i posted here ‘on my palette’ will just be posted again in ‘white skies, blue clouds.’

So by now, ‘white skies, blue clouds’ has posts numbering around…well, four.  So far, so good!  Hehe.  How embarrassing…  I have to remind myself to write more topics on education.  I do have a lot to say, tips to suggest, and research and resources to share but I couldn’t get around into doing it.  Something always comes up.

Well, one thing that I am certain of, I will write about ‘writing’ for the remaining month of November since, November IS National Novel Writing Month (NaNoMo). I will not attempt to write a novel (but how i would love to!–oh, if only...) but I do want to talk about writing and teaching kids about writing.

Well, there are only ten days remaining. so i better start cracking…